The Gregarious Railfan
Railroad Bridges
Gaviota Trestle
GPS:  N 34.47136, W 120.22751   Google map   

Scanner:  Union Pacific 161.550 [96]

Railroad:  Union Pacific Los Angeles Division, Santa Barbara Sub  

Railfan Access:  Excellent

Description:  Gaviota Railroad Trestle is one of Amtrak’s most photographed landmarks, anywhere in the nation. Each
day, a northbound and southbound Amtrak cross the dramatic 811-foot span, the longest railroad bridge between
Ventura and San Luis Obispo.  The bridge spans the tops of two dozen steel supports over small, reedy Gaviota Creek
near its outlet into the Pacific Ocean.  Below the bridge is Gaviota State Park, with camping spots virtually under the
trestle. A path to a popular fishing pier leads under the bridge.
The bridge was erected by Southern Pacific in late 1900, one of the last trestles built in the rush to close the gap
between Los Angeles and San Francisco.   For years this was the route of the famed Daylight.
Amtrak’s northbound Coast Starlight, which starts in Los Angeles, reaches the bridge around 1:30 p.m.  The
southbound train, which originates in Seattle, goes through around 5 p.m. (Warning: It can be late.)  The Pacific
Surfliner, a passenger train from San Luis Obispo to points south, with stops at Guadalupe and Surf, also uses the
trestle, as do freight trains.  The bridge can be seen from southbound Highway 101.
To get a close-up view, take the Gaviota State Park exit off 101 just south of the rest area, before the highway
makes its swing east.

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TRAINS Article on Gaviota Trestle   (access may be limited to subscribers)**
Map
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Pictures
Google images <Click on Thumbnails to enlarge>
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Disclaimer: I have not been to this location. Info is from the internet.  I would welcome pictures, additions, or
corrections to this page. Pictures and new info will be credited on the page. e-mail me at gregariousrailfan@gmail.com
Denver Todd is The Gregarious Railfan
Todd Sestero publishes the RAILFAN GUIDES of the U.S.